Best Reverb Plugin VST

We’ll look at what the best reverb plugin is. If you are going to do serious recording, then you need a few different types as opposed to just one. We’ll break these into categories, and pick the best for each.

The Best Reverb Plugins by Category

Plate Reverb

EMT 140

These reverbs literally used plates to create their sounds, and are especially good on vocals and drums.

UAD EMT 140 Plate Reverb
UAD EMT 140 Plate Reverb

The EMT 140 is not only the best Plate Reverb out there, but if we were forced to only pick one, this would be our pick for best reverb plugin overall. You can read our more in-depth review of the EMT 140 here.

Little Plate

Soundtoys Little Plate
Soundtoys Little Plate

The Soundtoys Little Plate is “in the style of” the EMT 140, but they didn’t want to be tied to modelling to a hardware unit. It’s much simpler to use than the EMT 140. We have a review on the Little Plate as well.

Spring Reverb

UAD AKG BX 20 Spring Reverb
UAD AKG BX 20 Spring Reverb

Some people consider this a cheap reverb sound, and it’s the type typically included on guitar amps.

The UAD AKG is quite a resource hog, so you won’t get many tracks out of it, but it sounds great.

Softube Spring Reverb

Softube Spring Reverb
Softube Spring Reverb

If you don’t have UAD hardware then a good second option would be Softube’s Spring Reverb. This was actually used by Andrew Scheps on an Adele album, so you know it must be high quality.

Digital Reverb

UAD Lexicon 224

The Lexicon 224 is one of the most iconic hardware reverb units ever. It has been used on a ton of (80s) hit records, and a few of their presets “just sound good” without a lot of tweaking required. The hardware was notorious for breaking down, making a software emulation quite convenient. Sometimes referred to as “dark” and a requirement if you are going for the Synthwave/Chillwave sound or are really into “Stranger Things”. This is one of our overall favorites and a definite go to. Definitely try it on Vocals and Drums.

UAD Lexicon 224
UAD Lexicon 224

UAD AMS RMX 16 Expanded

The AMS RMX was another gift from the 80s, and is best known for Phil Collins’ “In the Air Tonight” and Peter Gabriel’s “Sledgehammer”. This thing is amazing on drums and another must have if you like 80s Rock or Pop. It has lush hall reverbs, an awesome chorus, and a reverse setting that almost creates a snare roll out of one hit.

Softube TSAR-1

While it claims to not be modeled after anything, the interface is similar to the Lexicon, so it seems like that’s the inspiration. The slider for the Pre-Delay is on the opposite side as the Lexicon, and the High Cut seems synonymous with the Lexicon’s Treble Decay. It does offer a little more tweak-ability and you don’t have a UAD device, this might make a decent Lexicon substitute. It does include some Lexicon 224 presets, but also has some EMT plate presets as well as some originals.

Softube TSAR-1 Reverb
Softube TSAR-1 Reverb

Creative Reverb

Sandman Pro

Unfiltered Audio Sandman Pro
Unfiltered Audio Sandman Pro

Unfiltered Audio’s Sandman Pro is probably our favorite for “creative use” in that just playing with it will give you new ideas and get the creative juices flowing. If you have a track that’s a bit stale, try Sandman Pro! It can add a bit of swing to your track, similar to what a delay could do, but it can also do pitch shifting. You have to try it to really appreciate it. It’s the total opposite of a subtle EMT 140.

Exponential Audio R4

Exponential Audio R4
Exponential Audio R4

R4 by Exponential Audio is really great at creating lush reverbs to fill in the background space. It does this really well and if you are working on Synthwave or Ambient styles, this may be just what you need. While it can do plates and halls, the gate, filters and freeze functions make it more flexible. From a creative standpoint, you’d probably also need to get their Excalibur plugin to put it on par with Sandman Pro, but if you are doing Film Scoring, this is much better for sound design.

Room Reverb

ChromaVerb

Logic Pro X ChromaVerb
Logic Pro X ChromaVerb

This stock Logic Pro X plugin sounds really good, with 14 rooms to choose from. If you already own Logic Pro X, then you need to look no further.

Valhalla Room

Valhalla Room Reverb
Valhalla Room Reverb

Valhalla Room Reverb is an algorithmic reverb that offers room and hall models. While the price of ChromaVerb can’t be beat, if you don’t have Logic then this is a good option.

Ocean Way Studios

UAD Ocean Way Studios
UAD Ocean Way Studios

Some very famous recordings have occurred at Ocean Way Studios. This plugin let’s you play in those studios “virtually”, and is great if you want a natural sounding reverb as opposed to an effect. You can adjust the mic placement, as well as the mics used, and the volume of each.

Final Thoughts

There are many more to reverb plugins out there. Really what you need when starting out is a good Plate Reverb first. If you own UAD hardware, the EMT 140 is the absolute best reverb plugin followed by the Lexicon 224. For non UAD owners, the Sountoys Little Plate is your best option. If you are a Logic Pro X owner, make sure you’ve exhausted ChromaVerb before looking elsewhere. Sandman Pro is amazing if you want to get creative, and Exponential Audio’s R4 is the way to go if you want lush reverb to fill the spaces.