Comparison of Apple’s Audio Equalizers

While the Channel EQ is the workhorse, there are 3 audio equalizers in Logic’s Vintage EQ Collection that emulate classics. While the Channel EQ is the workhorse, sometimes it’s nice to try a vintage model. See if you think they are worth all the hype.

This is a dry EDM style track that I’ll run through each EQ on the mix bus so that you can hear the different styles. I tried to match all three to similar settings.

Dry – No EQ

The first, called Vintage Console EQ, is an homage of a Neve 1073 (or 1081) but lacks the dual knobs to select frequency and gain. They breakout the frequency below the gain on a separate knob. Apple describes the default output as smooth.

Neve
Neve
EQ – Neve

The next, Vintage Graphic EQ, is modeled off of an API 560 graphic EQ. This is probably most familiar to users as many home and car audio systems used a graphic eq. Apple describes the default output as punchy.

API
API
EQ API

The third audio equalizer, Vintage Tube EQ, is modeled off of the famous Pultec. (If not the most used EQ in history, at least the most legendary.) Although this is 2 units in one, usually the top half is the more commonly used, as it creates that “smile” dip the mids curve. Apple describes the default output as silky.

Pultec EQ
Pultec EQ
Pultec EQ

The “default” is the Channel EQ. If you know the frequencies and curves (Q) of the vintage equipment, you can do your own emulation in the Channel EQ.

Channel EQ
Channel EQ
Channel EQ

Hopefully this give you a good overview of the Vintage EQ Collection. While the Channel EQ offers a lot of flexibility (and a nice visual of what’s going on) as far as audio equalizers go, sometimes it’s nice to try an old standard.

Don’t forget to check out the other Logic Pro X Tutorials. Until next time…